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U.K. Pub Receives Glowing 1-Star Review


‘Happy to be a one star pub if this person’s idea of a five star pub is anything to go by!’

A U.K. pub called The Antelope received a one-star review complaining about the attentive service and wide beer selection.

U.K. Pub The Antelope made light of a review that was intended to dissuade potential patrons from going but actually highlighted the bar’s excellent service and bevy of beverage options. The comment was left in a Google Review of the Surbiton, London location by someone called Trace RT about a month ago.

“Looked okay from outside,” they wrote. No Stella, Kronenberg etc or any popular global beer.”

“We stayed for one pint and left to a proper pub that does well known beers. Bit of a hippy/ trendy crowd too which wasn't impressive. Also bar man far too enthusiastic and excited about selection of beers.”

The Antelope took a screenshot of the review and posted it to their social media with the caption, “Happy to be a one star pub if this person’s idea of a five star pub is anything to go by!” followed by a "face with tears of joy" emoji. Their post went viral and received over 700 likes and over 100 shares.

Subsequently the pub also received a ton of support and interest after sharing the one-star review bemoaning their attentive service, hip atmosphere, and wide selection of drinks.

“Great advert for The Antelope here. We’re all going there now,” commented a Facebook user.

“They probably headed to McDonalds afterwards for some ‘global cuisine,’” someone added about the original poster.

“How dare you offer a wide and regularly changing variety of ales and ciders? You’re bringing the whole neighborhood right down,” joked another.

The Daily Meal reached out to the pub's director Rich Craig, who told us, "I was happy to receive a review which shone a light on all of the things that we pride ourselves on at The Antelope - supporting local independent businesses, training our staff to be passionate about what we do and being a hub within our community attracting a diverse range of customers."

Craig said it was too early to tell if the review had impacted The Antelope's sales negatively or positively but added, "As a small business we are delighted by the positive response on social media."


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


Powerful Examples of How to Respond to Negative Reviews and Positive Reviews

Online reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, Yelp, and Tripadvisor give people a way to share their experiences not only with businesses but with fellow consumers, too. Consumers rely on these reviews in order to discover great businesses, products, services, and brands. This makes it extremely important for companies to learn how to respond to negative reviews as well as positive customer feedback.

  • 94% of consumers say that a bad review has convinced them to avoid a business.
  • 53% of customers expect businesses to respond to negative reviews within a week. But 63% say that a business has never responded to their review.
  • 45% of consumers say they’re more likely to visit a business that responds to negative reviews.

The takeaway: respond to negative reviews before they drive your customers away. Do this and consumer perceptions immediately improve, making it more likely that people will come and visit your business locations.

As for what to do with positive or neutral reviews — yes, they also warrant a response. Think of it as an opportunity to reinforce and spotlight the things customers already love about your company. (Not to mention, it’s the polite thing to do.) Need help navigating the (sometimes treacherous) waters of online reviews?

To help you respond to reviews better, we looked at 200,000 review responses in the ReviewTrackers database and combined their best features to come up with powerful examples and templates you can use to respond to your own reviews, whether they’re negative, positive, or neutral.

In addition to the templates, we scoured the Internet for great real-life examples of companies that know how to respond to negative reviews.


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